Author: Kate

When The FBI Does It, That Means That It’s Not Illegal

Captain Obvious;

Long-sought documents finally pried from U.S. intelligence agencies prove that the Obama administration used the occasion of providing a standard intelligence briefing for major-party candidates as an opportunity to investigate Donald Trump on suspicion of being a Russian asset.
 
I say investigate Donald Trump advisedly.
 
As I contended in Ball of Collusion, my book on the Trump-Russia investigation, the target of the probe spearheaded by the FBI — but greenlighted by the Obama White House, and abetted by the Justice Department and U.S. intelligence agencies — was Donald Trump. Not the Trump campaign, not the Trump administration. Those were of interest only insofar as they were vehicles for Trump himself. The campaign, which the Bureau and its apologists risibly claim was the focus of the investigation, would have been of no interest to them were it not for Trump.
 
Or do you suppose they moved heaven and earth, surreptitiously plotted in the Oval Office, wrote CYA memos to cover their tracks, and laboriously sculpted FBI reports because they were hoping to nail . . . George Papadopoulos?

Indeed. But read it all anyway.

One Flu Out Of The Wuhan Nest

WIV is Wuhan Institute of Virology. If you poke around in the replies and links, you’ll find a morning’s coffee worth of discussion, including this thread by Alita Chan. As a reminder, Yuri Deigin is the author of this Medium post of April, which if you haven’t read yet I recommend. But be warned, that will take a morning pot’s worth of coffee.

Y2Kyoto: McKenna Money

Toronto Sun;

“In 2017 and 2018 seven projects were funded for which researchers did not provide reports. Hence, their status is unknown,” said an Evaluation Of The Aquatic Climate Change Adaptation Services Program. “Under the current funding requirements there are no consequences if funded researchers do not submit reports, or reports are delayed.”
 
According to Blacklock’s, since 2017, the program, which is “the only federal program that advances research in the areas of aquatic climate change science,” cost $10.5 million, along with an extra $3.5 million in ongoing yearly spending.
 
The program has eight staff members, but “a federal website archiving the studies drew as few as fifty visits a month and was ‘hard to find and not easily navigable for users.’”

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