35 Replies to “RIP Christie Blatchford”

  1. What a shame.. First read her when the NatPost started.. Gutsy woman/reporter.. I hope she wrote a final on her health.. But yes.. RIP Christy Blatchford.

  2. I read of her passing this morning and while I never had the pleasure of meeting her, I found myself teary-eyed. She was a bastion of common sense who did not flinch from calling a spade a spade. She will be sorely missed by hosts of people who recognize old-fashioned 5W reporting as well as those whose conservative bent was nearly always buttressed by her well crafted and pointed prose.
    It’s a sad day.

  3. Too bad. In a world of cookie cutter journalism, she was definitely her own person and was not scared to go against the grain. Certainly not a journalist whose opinions could be bought or ordered up by the PMO. A rare, almost extinct, species not often seen in Canadian the media these days.

  4. What a loss. She’s gone to a better place. She was one of the greatest conservative voices in Canada.
    I know she died of cancer but Ezra should get “I am not suicidal” tattooed on his chest as a precaution anyways.

  5. Oh man….that is one huge loss.!! Likely the most common sense reporter I ever read.

    RIP Christie – YOU will be sorely missed.

  6. I have an anecdote about an email exchange I had with Christie seven or eight years ago. She was writing for the left-wing Globe and Mail back then, who at least had the sense to have her cover the crime and courts beat in the Toronto area. She wrote a splendid piece — an investigative piece — where she sat covering as many violent street gang cases as possible, at different stages of the cases. She wrote about how indifferent, soft-headed judges would let street hoods out on bail, with small amounts of bail, that was part of Ontario’s “catch and release” system. She also told of how witnesses would not show up because of intimidation.

    All of this meant for compelling reading, but what she had to say was limited to one lengthy article. So I emailed her, saying what a good article it was, and that she should do a series of articles on the “catch and release” problem. She emailed me back thanking me, but she said that the editors at the Globe had limited her to only one article on this problem, and that she was just assigned to cover less controversial areas. This fixed in my mind how sympathetic the Globe was, and is, to organized street crime. Since then, of course, the number of street gang shootings has skyrocketed.

    Since that exchange of emails, Blatchford moved first to the National Post, then to the Toronto Sun. She did stellar work, but all of it had been ignored by the dominant crime-sympathetic media.

  7. Christie Blatchford rocked!

    The early Christie:

    Blatchford Behind the Byline

    When it comes to the real Christie Blatchford, reading is not believing

    https://web.archive.org/web/20120327070747/http://www.rrj.ca/m3556/

    “The Blatchfords read the Sun but only on the days Christie’s column appears. Ross Blatchford prefers the Star, or the Globe for its minor hockey league schedules. He had reservations about his daughter working for such a “strange” newspaper. “There’s no news in it as far as I can tell,” he says with a chuckle. “It’s a columnist’s newspaper, though. I like to read Doug Fisher, Worthington, Porter, Buckley and link-he’s almost as far right as I am.” Politics is one of Christie and her father’s favorite battlegrounds. In his opinion, her politics swing far left, though she claims to be more conservative than most people her age.”

  8. gotta admire those who soldier on to the end.
    bravo Christie and tq for your numerous eye-openers.
    68.
    same age as me.
    damn.

  9. She came to mind these last few days and I wondered why she had stopped writing. Now we know the silence is forever. We are all in her debt for honest reportage and personal insight. I can’t think of a current Canadian journalist with comparable stature.
    Thanks Christie.

  10. I first read Christie during the Caledonia stand-off.
    She was the only person who reported what was happening, and the only one who kept writing about it after the rest of the media decided to ignore the obvious breach of law.
    Given what is happening now in Canada, a spirit like hers is needed more than ever.

  11. She was my favourite journalist. She covered court matters and was willing to describe what was actually occurring even though it went against the “official story” and caused her to receive disgusting hate mail and death threats. One classic example was the Ghomeshi trial where she wrote about how bad the witnesses were, and how their testimony was terrible, contradictory and contrived. She wrote about other cases that are difficult to discuss but where she indicated that the testimony did not match what was generally being reported as the narrative. She would inevitably be called terrible names, ugly and worse. She will be sorely missed.

    1. Canadian journalism, that is really funny, Christies death aside. Not much journalism left in Canada.

  12. Scumbag defense attorneys across Canada who make a living defending the indefensible are breathing a sigh of relief.

    So are hacks who do nothing but recycle Liberal press releases and tweets instead of doing legwork.

    So, doubtless, is Karla Homolka and whatever piece of filth she’s screwing these days.

    Rest in peace, Christie. They’ve all had their reward. Yours will be greater by far.

  13. Maxime Bernier
    @MaximeBernier

    It is with great sadness that I learned of the passing of Christie Blatchford this morning. I will never forget that video where she commented on my chapter on supply management and said she adored me!

    RIP Christie, we adored you too.

    https://nationalpost.com/opinion/christie-blatchford-how-much-do-i-love-max-bernier-let-me-count-the-cartels/amp?__twitter_impression=true

    https://mobile.twitter.com/MaximeBernier/status/1227617658134257665

  14. She will be missed, but Canada does have at least 1 good reporter left.
    Rex, that’s a lot of weight on your shoulders and big shoes to fill.

  15. Not a word in that article about her Caledonia standoff reporting. Her book about it called Helpless is excellent. Two excellent articles at the National Post written by her about Caledonia.

    Christie Blatchford: Caledonia natives still calling the shots in land dispute
    https://nationalpost.com/opinion/christie-blatchford-caledonia-natives-still-calling-the-shots

    Christie Blatchford: The disgraceful case against a man who dared carry a Canadian flag in Caledonia
    https://nationalpost.com/opinion/christie-blatchford-the-disgraceful-case-against-a-man-who-dared-carry-a-canadian-flag-in-caledonia

    Plus googling site:smalldeadanimals.com caledonia gives you great information about it from this very site.

  16. What a loss for all Canadians, regardless of political stripe. I found her apolitical, which is why I trusted her writing more than just about anyone else I can think of. I’ve just finished her most recent book ‘Life Sentence’, a scathing indictment of Canada’s ‘justice system’ and the clubby relationships between judges, lawyers and various politicos.

    I’m going to miss reading her common sense and very readable yet in-depth, commentary. Truly a sad day for Canada.

  17. Um…I don’t believe that’s quite right.

    She started at the Sun, wasn’t aware she went back?

    BTW, staff off Twitter. First one I saw was of course from a protester hating on Blatch. As the next tweet say, though, “You’ll die alone and sad”.

    Think I’ll head down to the local barricade and sit reading my copy of “Helpless”…

    RIP

      1. Yes, but the poster wrote:

        “She was writing for the left-wing Globe and Mail back then…Since that exchange of emails, Blatchford moved first to the National Post, then to the Toronto Sun.”

        I believe it was: Globe, Toronto Star, Toronto Sun, National Post, Globe again, Post again at the last.

        Could be wrong, and not a big thing today.

        Just a sad day for real journalism. Doesn’t say much that she had bigger balls than 99% of the male writers.

  18. It does not matter who she wrote for, her words were her own.

    One of my very favourite columnists, wondered why there had not been any columns recently.

    I will miss her wit, perspective and truth in many of her writings.

    Someone needs to pick up the torch.

  19. Years ago Christie wrote a piece about how her and her girlfriend were invited to a golf tournament. Neither one played golf so they took off their tops and went through the course wacking balls in their bras. Funny as shit. Rest in peace Christie and thank-you.

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