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Economics For The Disinterested

"After many years of frustration about the absence of realistic information about economics for a lay person I decided to research the topic and write a book for the layman. This book outlines how an economy comes about, what drives people making transactions and what means are used. It is a simple explanantion of what goes on around us in the world and how to make sense of all the activity. The book then goes on to show how the government and banks, especially the IMF and World Bank, influence and inhibit our financial freedom and how this interference causes all the problems of economies around the world. Finally, a section explains a little about how to best arrange your financial well-being since we have not been taught this in grade school or any other school later in life." -- Lutz Jacoby


22 Comments

Hmmmmm."Disinterested" and "uninterested" are not the same word. Does the author know this?

"Hmmmmm."Disinterested" and "uninterested" are not the same word. Does the author know this?"

First thing I thought of too. Call me a pedant, but I lose confidence in the quality of the contents when the author can't even get his title right.

Then of course there's Henry Hazlitt's masterpiece Economics in One Lesson which should be given to all young people who show some interest in the topic.

How does this compare to Thomas Sowell's Basic Economics?

What if the "disinterest" is genuine?
As the tools of trade have been corrupted,twisted and the rewards stolen by bureaucrats, normal citizens have become disinterested in trying to comprehend a totally bollocked apparatus.
Economics as currently pretended by our "authorities" is a scam a huge bubble of unreality, especially where fiat money comes into play.
Normal trade is to trade for what we need and store our surplus for emergencies.
Current unit of exchange and storage methods have neither value or meaning, trust is collapsing.
One wonders what the new unit of exchange will be?
Back to the old? For all the same reasons.?
What do we have that that is of limited supply, an imperishable nature and easily subdivided.?
Human intelligence?

Both definitions (Webster's) use "indifferent" as a meaning for either word. Both you and Thon Brocket came across as pseudo-intellectual snobs. It's a wonder either of you can be bothered to read the comments on SDA as many, if not most, are filled with typos etc.

I have read a little of Lutz Jacoby's new work, this morning. It reads well. Very much against socialism, very much of a free market orientation (all good). Not so funny as Sowell. Like Sowell, Jacoby is very clear and jargon-free.

Just curious, can someone elaborate a bit on how banks "stole our freedoms?". As in asking us to pay back money we've borrowed to buy/do things we don't want to wait for? Or in providing efficient methods for moving money from the future to the present, where it will most ably serve those who need it?

The word 'disinterested' was chosen quite deliberately. If a person is uninterested they will not read a book about economics. The person who is disinterested does not hold any particular opinion about economic conditions - as in disinterested bystander, for example, but may want to learn more to enable an opinion to be formed. The potential reader I am after is someone who does wonder what is going on out there in the economic world but does not have the material at hand nor the background to decide what to follow.
I am not claiming to be an economist, but I have assembled what I found out about economics from a standing start and tried to explain how I found a lot of information through a bit of research and compiled this into a basic book.

Thank you John for those very kind words. Lutz.

Just curious, can someone elaborate a bit on how banks "stole our freedoms?". As in asking us to pay back money we've borrowed to buy/do things we don't want to wait for?

Well, if you can figure out how to repay interest bearing money, created out of thin air, without creating inflation, let me know. All fiat money is created as debt, bearing interest. Even the interest bears interest, since it's also issued as debt. Classic Ponzi scheme. Repay debt with future debt.

It's rather obvious money buys a whole lot less than it did 40 years ago. Nothing like real world proof. Theft of wealth has been going on for years and savers have always been penalized.

Andrew Jackson called them a "den of thieves and vipers". Of course, they're removing him, and part of his legacy, from the US $20 bill.

http://freedomoutpost.com/andrew-jackson-who-fought-central-bank-removed-from-20-as-public-concern-for-liberty-erased/

Fair enough.

Rob, look up the words, they are clearly different.

DISinterested means you don't have anything to gain from it.
UNinterested mean this isn't something you'd watch or read.

Since the author himself said he wrote this for the 'layman' then that means it would be for someone who is INTerested in the subject because they want to GAIN knowledge from it.

Empahsis to clarify points.

So both posters were correct in pointing this out.

Lutz, better look up the word and proper usage again. I had to.

dis·in·ter·est·ed
disˈintrəstəd,disˈin(t)əˌrestəd/
adjective
adjective: disinterested

1.
not influenced by considerations of personal advantage.
"a banker is under an obligation to give disinterested advice"
synonyms: unbiased, unprejudiced, impartial, neutral, nonpartisan, detached, uninvolved, objective, dispassionate, impersonal, clinical; More
open-minded, fair, just, equitable, balanced, even-handed, with no ax to grind
"disinterested advice"
2.
having or feeling no interest in something.
"her father was so disinterested in her progress that he only visited the school once"

Thanks again for the interest shown and the purchases. Ultimately the title is secondary, it is to catch attention. What matters is what's in the book to my mind. I guess no one has made it to the aliens yet.

AS the old saying goes "can't judge a book by its cover"...

"Hmmmmm."Disinterested" and "uninterested" are not the same word. Does the author know this?"

Hmmmmm."Disinterested" and "uninterested" are synonyms in any of the online dictionaries. Does the original poster know this?

There seems to be a lot of, er, interest in the author's choice of title.

Disinterested could readily be interpreted as "objective". Indeed, to the objective observer, the practice of economics has vast and gaping holes in both it's pedagogy and orthodoxy.

Disinterested could readily be interpreted as "objective". Indeed, to the objective observer, the practice of economics has vast and gaping holes in both it's pedagogy and orthodoxy.

Disinterested could readily be interpreted as "objective". Indeed, to the objective observer, the practice of economics has vast and gaping holes in both it's pedagogy and orthodoxy.

Is anyone else finding that the link is not working?
Thanks.

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Recent Comments

  • Wayne Robbins: Is anyone else finding that the link is not working? read more
  • Timothy S.: Disinterested could readily be interpreted as "objective". Indeed, to the read more
  • Timothy S.: Disinterested could readily be interpreted as "objective". Indeed, to the read more
  • Timothy S.: Disinterested could readily be interpreted as "objective". Indeed, to the read more
  • just a guy: There seems to be a lot of, er, interest in read more
  • John Doe: "Hmmmmm."Disinterested" and "uninterested" are not the same word. Does the read more
  • johnbrooks: AS the old saying goes "can't judge a book by read more
  • Lutz Jacoby: Thanks again for the interest shown and the purchases. Ultimately read more
  • johnbrooks: Lutz, better look up the word and proper usage again. read more
  • johnbrooks: Rob, look up the words, they are clearly different. DISinterested read more